Last edited by Kilkree
Friday, July 31, 2020 | History

4 edition of Court and Bakufu in Japan found in the catalog.

Court and Bakufu in Japan

Jeffrey P. Mass

Court and Bakufu in Japan

Essays in Lamakura History

by Jeffrey P. Mass

  • 282 Want to read
  • 6 Currently reading

Published by Yale University Press .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Asian / Middle Eastern history: c 500 to c 1500,
  • Japan,
  • Japan - History,
  • History - General History,
  • History,
  • Kamakura period, 1185-1333,
  • History: World

  • The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Number of Pages322
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL9849850M
    ISBN 100300026536
    ISBN 109780300026535

    Japan - Japan - The Muromachi (or Ashikaga) period (–): On the accession of Go-Daigo, the retired emperor Go-Uda broke the long-established custom and dissolved the office of retired emperor (in no chō). As a result, the entire authority of the imperial government was concentrated in the hands of a single emperor, Go-Daigo. A party of young reforming court nobles gathered around the. Although the imperial court in Heian continued to claim authority, Kamakura was the seat of the warrior government known as the Kamakura bakufu, which dominated the political life of Japan during the period. The Kamakura bakufu was the first in a series of warrior regimes that governed Japan until the mid-nineteenth century.

      Bakufu, literally: "tent office", refers to the military governments that ruled Japan from to with a few exceptions in the 14th century when the Emperor ruled. Under the Bakufu system of government the Emperor was the head of state but had little real power. A Shogun, or military commander, ruled Japan. Then in , American Ranald MacDonald came to Japan, after pretending to be shipwrecked, and taught English to fourteen official Japanese interpreters of Dutch in Nagasaki under Bakufu orders. It would be one of MacDonald's students named Moriyama who would act as interpreter between the United States and Japan in order to establish trade.

    Previously, Japanese culture was strongly influenced by the Chinese. However, Kamakura was in the East, far away from China. The Kamakura period marked the decline of Chinese influence on Japanese culture. During the Kamakura period, three main sources of governmental authority coexisted: 1. The imperial emperor's court was secured by the. The twin centers of Japanese culture in the Nara and Heian periods were A) Buddhist monasteries and the imperial court. B) colonies of Korean exiles and government bureaucrats. C) Hindu yogis and samurai estates. D) secular schools of philosophy and European missionaries.


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Court and Bakufu in Japan by Jeffrey P. Mass Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Kamakura period,Court and Bakufu in Japan book known as the era of Japan's first warrior government. As the essays in this book show, however, the period was notable for the coexistence of two centers of authority, the Bakufu military government at Kamakura and the civilian court in Kyoto, with the newer warrior government gradually gaining ascendancy.4/5(3).

Court and Bakufu in Japan: Essays in Kamakura History by Jeffrey P. Mass (Editor) out of 5 stars 2 ratings5/5(2). The Kamakura period,is known as the era of Japan's first warrior government. As the essays in this book show, however, the period was notable for the coexistence of two centers of.

Court and Bakufu in Japan by Jeffrey P. Mass,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide.4/5(3). Description The Kamakura period,is known as the era of Japan's first warrior government.

This book shows that the period was notable for the coexistence of two centres of authority, the Bakufu military government at Kamakura and the civilian court in Kyoto, with the newer warrior government gradually gaining ascendancy.

Court and Bakufu in Japan: Essays in Kamakura History Mass, Jeffrey P. (editor, introduction) Published by Yale University Press, New Haven and London ().

BOOKS AUTHORS REQUESTS ABOUT. BOOKS AUTHORS REQUESTS ABOUT. STANFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS. STANFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS. STANFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS. Court and Bakufu in Japan.

Essays in Kamakura History. Edited, with an Introduction, by Jeffrey P. Mass. BUY THIS BOOK. pages. from $ Hardcover ISBN: Court of Injustice. The Kamakura period,is known as the era of Japan's first warrior government.

As the essays in this book show, however, the period was notable for the coexistence of two centers of authority, the Bakufu military government at Kamakura and the civilian court in Kyoto, with the newer warrior government gradually gaining ascendancy.5/5(1).

The bakufu was the military government of Japan between andheaded by the tothe bakufu—also known as shogonate—was responsible only for warfare and policing and was firmly subordinate to the imperial the centuries, however, the bakufu's powers expanded, and it became, effectively, the ruler of Japan for nearly : Kallie Szczepanski.

Court & Bakufu in Japan: Essays in Kamakura History. by Jeffrey P. Mass (Editor). ISBN pp. The Kamakura period () of Japanese history is considered to be the time when political power shifted from the Imperial Court in Kyoto to the Bakufu (Warrior government) in Kamakura.

However, it was not an abrupt change as comes about by a revolution for example, but a slow. Book Search Engine Can Find Court and Bakufu in Japan. Essays in Kamakura History by MASS, JEFFREY P (EDITOR) Court and Bakufu in Japan. Essays in Kamakura History. By: MASS, JEFFREY P. Show me the best price for this book.

Books ordered may be returned for a full refund if they are not as described. Delivery is guaranteed - or your money back. The Kamakura period,is known as the era of Japan's first warrior government. As the essays in this book show, however, the period was notable for the coexistence of two centers of authority, the Bakufu military government at Kamakura and the civilian court in Kyoto, with the newer warrior government gradually gaining :   Kamakura bakufu (–) In the late Heian period, the House of Minamoto (源) invaded Kyoto during the so-called Genpei Wars (–, 源平合戦 genpei kassen) between the Minamoto and the Taira (平) clan, resulting in the fall of the latter and the establishment of the Kamakura bakufu under Minamoto no Yoritomo, who seized the power from the central government and the court.

This third volume of The Cambridge History of Japan is devoted to the three and a half centuries spanning the final decades of the twelfth century when the Kamakura bakufu was founded to the mid-sixteenth century when civil wars raged following the demise of the Muromachi bakufu.

Excellent. The details in history, combined with intelligent insight, makes for an excellent resource. For anyone interested in knowing names, dates, events that shaped Kamakura and the Bakufu that thrived in it, I recommend this book with 6 stars.5/5.

This book is a much expanded and wholly rewritten treatment of the subject of the author's first book, Warrior Government in Early Medieval Japan, published in In this new version, the.

Japan - Japan - Political reform in the bakufu and the han: The second half of the Tokugawa period is characterized by continual political reforms made by the samurai overlords in response to this ongoing economic crisis.

Such reforms began with the Kyōhō Reforms instituted by the eighth shogun, Tokugawa Yoshimune (ruled –45). Yoshimune proved adept at personnel matters. This book is a much expanded and wholly rewritten treatment of the subject of the author's first book, Warrior Government in Early Medieval Japan, published in In this new version, the warrior and medieval character of Japan's first shogunate is significantly de-emphasized, thus requiring not only a new title, but also a new book.

The author's new view of the final decades of twelfth. The Kamakura period,is known as the era of Japan's first warrior government. As the essays in this book show, however, the period was notable for the coexistence of two centers of authority, the Bakufu military government at Kamakura and the civilian court in Kyoto.

This volume analyzes the recurring form of warrior government known as the Bakufu (or shogunate) that ruled Japan for nearly years. All the essays in this collection clarify aspects of Japanese political tradition that have been neglected by Western writers, and point out alternatives to already stated views/5(1).

"Japan". The World Book Encyclopedia. World Book. pp. 34– ISBN Mass, Jeffrey P. and William B. Hauser, eds. (). The Bakufu in Japanese History. Stanford: Stanford University Press. McCune, George M. (May ). "The Exchange of Envoys between Korea and Japan During the Tokugawa Period".

The Far Eastern Quarterly.The Kamakura period,is known as the era of Japan's first warrior government. This book shows that the period was notable for the coexistence of two centres of authority, the Bakufu military government at Kamakura and the civilian court in Kyoto, with the newer warrior government gradually gaining ascendancy.The proximity of the imperial court to the bakufu resulted in a commingling of imperial family members, courtiers, daimyō, samurai, and Zen priests.

Art of all kinds—architecture, literature, Noh drama, comedy, poetry, the tea ceremony, landscape gardening, and flower .